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Remembering My Friend, Hiroshi Yamauchi | Nintendo
Hiroshi Yamauchi, the visionary former president of Nintendo, passed away on September 19 at the age of 85. Yamauchi was notoriously private; he rarely made public appearances or gave interviews. One of the few people who could claim to have been close with him is Henk Rogers, a game industry pioneer who moved to Japan in the late 1970s and started a publisher called Bullet-Proof Software. Rogers, now managing director of The Tetris Company, struck up what would become a lengthy friendship with Yamauchi.
One day [circa 1985], my wife showed me an article in a Japanese magazine that said that Nintendo’s president Hiroshi Yamauchi played Go, a Japanese board game. Coincidentally, someone had sent me a Go game for the Commodore 64. The C64 had the same CPU as Nintendo’s Famicom (NES), a 6502.

I sent Mr. Yamauchi a fax on a Tuesday, telling him I could make a Go game for the Famicom and that I would like to meet him before I left for the States that Saturday.
I got a reply on Wednesday saying that Mr. Yamauchi would meet me on Thursday. Nintendo had told the top PC game companies, including Square, Enix and my company Bullet-Proof Software, that they could not make Nintendo games. But I had managed to get an audience with the man himself. 
Read the rest of the article here.

Remembering My Friend, Hiroshi Yamauchi | Nintendo

Hiroshi Yamauchi, the visionary former president of Nintendo, passed away on September 19 at the age of 85. Yamauchi was notoriously private; he rarely made public appearances or gave interviews. One of the few people who could claim to have been close with him is Henk Rogers, a game industry pioneer who moved to Japan in the late 1970s and started a publisher called Bullet-Proof Software. Rogers, now managing director of The Tetris Company, struck up what would become a lengthy friendship with Yamauchi.

One day [circa 1985], my wife showed me an article in a Japanese magazine that said that Nintendo’s president Hiroshi Yamauchi played Go, a Japanese board game. Coincidentally, someone had sent me a Go game for the Commodore 64. The C64 had the same CPU as Nintendo’s Famicom (NES), a 6502.

I sent Mr. Yamauchi a fax on a Tuesday, telling him I could make a Go game for the Famicom and that I would like to meet him before I left for the States that Saturday.

I got a reply on Wednesday saying that Mr. Yamauchi would meet me on Thursday. Nintendo had told the top PC game companies, including Square, Enix and my company Bullet-Proof Software, that they could not make Nintendo games. But I had managed to get an audience with the man himself.

Read the rest of the article here.

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